Three Mississippi legislators were elected to judicial posts this year, necessitating special elections for the final year of the legislative term. But none of the seats will be competitive from a partisan standpoint.

By: Brett Kittredge, Director of Marketing and Communications for Mississippi Center for Public Policy.

Rep. Brad Touchstone, a freshman Republican lawmaker from Oak Grove, was elected County Journal Judge in Lamar county on November 6. Touchstone was instrumental in the passage of the Occupational Board Compliance Act of 2017, key occupational licensure reform the legislature adopted two years ago.

The district is overwhelmingly Republican and certain to stay in the Republican column.

Two Democrats also won judicial positions. Rep. Adrienne Wooten of Jackson was elected a Hinds County Circuit Court judge while Rep. Willie Perkins of Greenwood was elected a chancery judge for the judicial district that covers Bolivar, Coahoma, Leflore, Quitman, Tallahatchie and Tunica counties.

Both of these districts are certain to stay in Democratic hands.

Gov. Phil Bryant will set a special election after the members formally resign from the legislature. The special election winners, particularly if they win a runoff, will only be present for a short period of time for the session that concludes the first week of April.

They will then have to get back on the campaign trail and win again in the fall when every seat in the legislature is on the ballot.