Gov.-elect Tate Reeves and wife Elee Reeves photographed on Tuesday, November 26, 2019.

UPDATE: The inauguration for Governor-Elect Tate Reeves has been officially moved inside due to the threat of rain.

Since the House Chamber has a limit to accommodations, Y’all Politics will be live tweeting the event. You can also stream the swearing in through MPB on the link above.

Early Tuesday morning, the inaugural parade was also cancelled due to the threat of severe weather. All other events will continue as scheduled.



**The below details of Governor-Elect Reeves’ inauguration have changed**

Tuesday, Tate Reeves will be sworn in as the 65th governor of the State of Mississippi. Pending the forecast for rain, here’s what you can expect to happen if you are in downtown Jackson for the festivities.

MOVED: The day kicks off with the official inauguration on the South side of the State Capitol building at 10:30am. Reeves will be joined by family, friends, and other statewide officials for the event. If the weather does become severe, this will be moved indoors in the Mississippi House of Representatives chambers. The decision is scheduled to be made sometime Monday.

CANCELLED: Following the official swearing in, a parade will be held in downtown Jackson. Statewide elected officials are scheduled to join the First Family and new Governor in front of the Governor’s Mansion on Capitol Street. The parade will begin at the Mississippi Fairgrounds and will include participants such as school marching bands, dance teams and cheer squads.

Following the parade, the doors to the Governor’s Mansion will be open for an open house lasting until 4:15pm. Capping off the evening is the Inaugural Ball at the Mississippi Trade Mart from 7:00pm until 11:00pm. This portion of the day is a ticketed event and not open to the general public. You can purchase a ticket below:

https://www.forallmississippi.com/

Reeves succeeds current Governor Phil Bryant. Before being elected Governor, Reeves served as State Treasurer from 2004-2012, and as Lt. Governor from 2012-2020. He is one of 12 Mississippians to serve as Lt. Governor before moving on to be Governor, and the first to serve two terms in the position before moving up.