Y’all Politics brings you a Bill of the Day from the Mississippi Legislature that just may pique your interest.

Critical Race Theory has become a major concern for many parents across Mississippi, as the racially divisive narratives promoted by the educational curriculum flowing from its school of thought have made their way into public school libraries and classrooms in one form or another.

Governor Tate Reeves and Speaker Philip Gunn have both spoken out against the inclusion of Critical Race Theory teachings in the state’s schools.

As such, State Rep. Becky Currie (R) has filed a bill – HB 437 – that would establish the “Teaching Racial and Universal Equality (TRUE) Act,” seeking to prohibit the Mississippi State Board of Education and local school districts from including and promoting divisive concepts as part of their curriculum or allowing teachers to use such materials to supplement their classroom instruction.

The bill defines “divisive concepts” using the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as a guide, largely setting the baseline as that no race or sex is inherently superior or inferior to another.

It further outlines this understanding, setting further that an individual, by virtue of the individual’s race or sex, is not inherently or systemically racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously, or nor do they have negative or positive characteristics that inhere in the individual’s DNA. The bill states the understanding that no individual should be discriminated against, favored, or receive differential treatment solely or partly because of the individual’s race or sex.

Instead, Rep. Currie is advocating for schools to use impartial historical materials in their instruction and discussions in the classroom.

“The State Board of Education, school or school governing authority shall not include or promote divisive concepts as part of a course of instruction or in a curriculum or instructional program, or allow teachers or other employees of the school to use supplemental instructional materials that include or promote divisive concepts,” the bill notes.

Currie’s legislation would see that each school governing authority – the school board – adopt policies and procedures for the investigation of any complaints relative to noncompliance with this act.

You can read the full version of the bill here.