The tradition of a National Day of Prayer began with the First Continental Congress in 1775 and was codified in 1952 by Congress.

Today, America recognizes the power and importance of prayer in our lives.

A National Day of Prayer was first called by the First Continental Congress in 1775 and again by Abraham Lincoln in 1863. The official day was created in 1952 by a joint resolution of the United States Congress and signed into law by President Harry Truman.  The day was then solidified as a national tradition in 1988 by President Ronald Reagan, who designated the National Day of Prayer as the first Thursday in May.

“Let us as a nation join together before God, aware of the trials that lie ahead and of the need for divine guidance,” President Reagan once wrote, adding, “With unshakable faith in God and the liberty which is our heritage, we as a free nation will continue to grow and prosper.”

Many cities and counties are hosting National Day of Prayer events throughout Mississippi.

This year’s National Day of Prayer theme as chosen by the National Day of Prayer Task Force is “Exalt the Lord who has established us,” and the scripture reference is taken from Colossians 2:6-7 which states, “So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him, strengthened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness.”

As directed by law, President Joe Biden issued an annual proclamation designating today as a “National Day of Prayer.”  In his proclamation, Biden stated, “I call upon the citizens of our Nation to give thanks, in accordance with their own faiths and consciences, for our many freedoms and blessings, and I invite all people of faith to join me in asking for God’s continued guidance, mercy, and protection.”