What problem? Melton is qualified

Mayor Harvey Johnson’s reaction to Frank Melton’s homestead exemption in Texas revealed how desperate he is to retain his position (“Melton’s status on ballot challenged,” April 5).

Johnson’s statements suggest that the public should dissect Melton’s life because of this issue. There is no hint of foul play on Melton’s part, so an invitation to dissect his private affairs was an attempt to get Melton kicked out of the election before it even starts.

If the Mississippi Constitution states that one only has to have lived in the state for six months to be eligible for the race, then what’s the problem?

One has to wonder if Johnson is diverting attention as a means to hide his own inadequacies as mayor. A politician should run on his record and accomplishments .

Melissa Wilson
Flowood

Vote to re-elect Harvey Johnson

I first want to say I only work in Jackson. I live in Madison County.

But I have known Harvey Johnson – Lieutenant Harvey, as we called him – since about 1970 when he was assigned to Iraklion Air Station, Crete, Greece.

Ironically, we’ve never met up with each other since then, even though we have been living in close proximity for years.

But I will say that Harvey Johnson would not change from the caring individual I once knew in the Air Force. This man sees no color, only good in people.

Harvey cares about Jackson and needs the time to carry out his plans. Voters need Harvey Johnson to bring about the needed changes that will propel Jackson back into the great city it once was.

I believe Harvey can do this if citizens of Jackson will only trust him with their vote for mayor.

Charley W. Cook
Canton

Johnson supporters ‘running scared’

I write in response to your article on Frank Melton (“Melton’s status on ballot challenged,” April 5).

The truth of the matter is, Mayor Harvey Johnson and his supporters are running scared, and rightfully so.

Sorry, Mayor: It’s time for a change.

To quote his opponent’s most memorable phrase: “That, my friends, is the bottom line.”

Patrice Johnson
Jackson

Melton wrong: Voting doesn’t ruin a journalist’s credibility

I read with interest Eric Stringfellow’s column on Frank Melton’s voting record, or the lack thereof (“Why back candidate who does not vote?” April 10).

Granted, I do not live in Jackson. However, one point in the column concerns me as a journalist.

According to Mr. Stringfellow, Melton calls a flier distributed against him a distortion: “The former TV commentator and executive said he did not vote in local races to protect his credibility.”

He goes on to say: “Because of the nature of my position in the media, it would have been unethical for me to support one candidate over the other. I wanted to be impartial and chose to vote in other places,” referring to his hometown of Houston, Texas.

Is he saying that every journalist in this state is not credible by virtue of our jobs if we exercise our constitutional right of voting? Is he saying that journalists must forfeit our voting rights as citizens before we can comment on issues?

How can voting in private be an attack on credibility or show unethical behavior for anybody?

Journalists in this state have earned the right to comment on issues of the day by participating in the democratic process. By voting, we have chosen to be a part of the solution.

Melton further attacks his own credibility by being registered in two states. In my opinion, he has lost credibility, by his own admission, of ever criticizing voter fraud.

Until now, I admired Melton’s tell-it-like-it-is stances and would have possibly considered voting for him if I lived in Jackson.

Now, he has lost credibility with me. Sadly, I ask: Is the current slate of candidates, including the incumbent mayor, the best Jackson has to offer?

Chris Allen Baker
Forest