BOBBY HARRISON: Many factors in play with politics of the state flag

The flag, which some say is a symbol of hate and slavery and others argue represents the state’s heritage, is still an issue. And the mixed signals surrounding the flag not only apply to its meaning, but also to the politicians who hold sway over the future of the symbol.

Apparently there are politicians in Tupelo city government who believe after a closed door meeting with Republican Gov. Phil Bryant that he intends to make as part of his legislative agenda for 2017 changing the flag. They have stated such publicly. But the governor says that is not the case. He says his position remains that he would like another statewide vote on the issue….

…Could Gunn expend extraordinary political to change the flag? Perhaps, but he must be thinking why try to undertake such a Herculean effort if Reeves and Bryant, who would ultimately have to sign any flag legislation into law, are not on board.

By far, the most interesting part of the equation is that in the Senate, if a flag bill ever was voted on by the full chamber, it is feasible that there are enough votes to change the flag. It is possible that there are enough members of the Republican majority who would vote with near unanimous support of the Democratic minority to carry the day for a new flag.

But if the presiding officer of the Senate is not on board, that scenario is not likely to happen.

Daily Journal
11/2/16