How long do we have to pretend it’s a race?

In Musgrove, Barbour faced a challenger who knew the state budget and the innerworkings of government like the back of his hand. In Eaves, Barbour faces a challenger who at times appears to be under the impression that state programs are funded with Monopoly money.

In Musgrove, Barbour faced a challenger who was a relentless, effective campaigner who knew how to stay on message and was skilled in facing tough questions. In Eaves, Barbour faces a challenger whose message is that “the money changers are holding Mississippi back” while campaigning as one of the state’s wealthiest men. It’s a message that he simply can’t sell and it’s all that he’s got.

After twice hearing Mr. Eaves – a nice guy, to be sure – make his pitch to be elected governor, it’s clear to me that pretending this is still a viable race both annoys me and insults Mr. Eaves’ intelligence.

Sid Salter
Clarion Ledger
7/21/7