Sid Salter: Election turnout up in air

So in the cases of Initiative 42 and Initiative 42A, the first question will ask them to choose between “either measure” or “neither measure” becoming law. Then, voters will confront the actual initiative questions, which they can vote for or against, regardless of their answer to the first question.

If a majority chooses “either measure,” then the measure from the second question with the most votes will become law, so long as that measure also receives at least 40 percent of the total number of ballots cast in the election. If a majority chooses “neither measure,” then neither amendment becomes law.
In other words, initiative voting is long, unwieldy and difficult. It was designed to be so. Now, for the first time in our state’s history, there are competing ballot initiatives.

But other than Hood’s race with GOP challenger Mike Hurst, what statewide race really draws voters to the polls this time around? That question is the hole card for supporters of Initiative 42. Low turnout among conservative voters will complement an organized, well-financed get-out-the-vote effort by backers of the initiative.

ClarionLedger
10/7/15